PACER Offers Resources to Parents, Professionals, and Youth

Ask a Question / Leave a Comment 1 person likes this News, Persons with Disabilities or Family members, State VR Administrators, Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors, VRTAC-QE

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PACER supports parents, professionals, and youth to help them secure a free and appropriate public education for children and young adults with disabilities. Their services include assistance to individual families; workshops; and informational materials for parents, professionals, and leadership. Based in Minnesota, their work affects and encourages families across the nation.

Featured Resources

PACER’s wide variety of resources includes:

Workshpos and Live Streams Events

Pacer offers live and archived workshops on topics of interest to parents, professionals, and youth. Access PACER’s workshops.

Minnesota Dispute Resolution Guide: A Mobile-Friendly Resource for Parents

This new online guide from PACER Center provides information, helpful tools, and links to further resources, so parents can navigate their options for resolving disputes with the school district with confidence. Get the Minnesota Dispute Resolution Guide..

PACER Tip Sheet: Making Decisions About Your Individualized Education Program (IEP) After You Turn 18

This tip sheet gives information to help students who are over 18 and the signers of their own Individualized Education Program (IEP) make decisions with their IEP team. PACER Tip Sheet: Making Decisions About Your Individualized Education Program (IEP).

PACER Tip Sheet: Solving Disagreements with Your Individualized Education Program (IEP) Team After You Turn 18

and the signers of their own Individualized Education Program (IEP) solve disagreements when they occur. PACER Tip Sheet: Solving Disagreements with Your Individualized Education Program.

National Bullying Center

How is bullying defined? Does bullying happen more often than adults think? What if my child is the one bullying? How does bullying impact a students’ health? Here you will find the answers to these questions and many more, along with helpful information about cyberbullying, students with disabilities, and research. Visit PACER’s National Bullying Center.

Learn More About Pacer

Tremendous Opportunities for Competitive Integrated Employment

The landscape of law and policy on transition from school to employment for students with disabilities has changed significantly in recent years.

  • Federal court cases have clarified and explained the application of the ADA and Olmstead v. L.C. to employment-related transition services for youth with disabilities.
  • In 2014, Congress enacted WIOA, amending provisions of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and expanding both the scope of transition services and the population of young people who are eligible to receive them.
  • The federal government issued guidance about the provision of employment-related transition services and the obligations of state agencies, such as vocational rehabilitation, education, and developmental disability agencies, regarding transition.

These changes to law and policy have complementary qualities, and when read together, reflect tremendous opportunities for state and local governments, youth with disabilities, their families, service providers, employers, and others to drive successful employment outcomes for youth with disabilities in competitive integrated employment.

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